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16th Street Baptist Church Bombing Victims Bronze Medal 3” (BC1)

16TH ST BAPTIST CHURCH BRONZE MEDAL 3�
16TH ST BAPTIST CHURCH BRONZE MEDAL 3" View 1 16TH ST BAPTIST CHURCH BRONZE MEDAL 3" View 2 16TH ST BAPTIST CHURCH BRONZE MEDAL 3" View 3
Product will be available for shipping 05/10/2014
Mintage Limit: None
Product Limit: None
Household Order Limit: None
Available by Subscription: No
$39.95
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The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing Victims Bronze Medal is a duplicate of the Congressional Gold Medal awarded posthumously to Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley. Fifty years ago, the deaths of these four young African-American girls at the church located in downtown Birmingham, AL, sparked “The Movement that Changed the World.” On that tragic Sunday, September 15, 1963, people around the world took notice of the violence that occurred with the struggle for civil rights.

The obverse (heads) features the silhouette of four young girls, representing those killed on September 15, 1963. Their names, ADDIE MAE COLLINS, DENISE McNAIR, CAROLE ROBERTSON and CYNTHIA WESLEY, are inscribed around the border of the design. The quote PIVOTAL IN THE STRUGGLE FOR EQUALITY and additional inscriptions SEPTEMBER 15 and 1963, are incused across the silhouettes.

The reverse (tails) depicts a view of the 16th Street Baptist Church with the quote KILLED IN THE BOMBING OF THE 16TH ST. BAPTIST CHURCH to the left of the image. Additional inscriptions are ACT OF CONGRESS 2013 and BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA.

The 16th Street Baptist Church Bombing Victims Bronze Medal is a duplicate of the Congressional Gold Medal awarded posthumously to Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley. Fifty years ago, the deaths of these four young African-American girls at the church located in downtown Birmingham, AL, sparked “The Movement that Changed the World.” On that tragic Sunday, September 15, 1963, people around the world took notice of the violence that occurred with the struggle for civil rights. These young girls’ deaths, inflicted while they were getting ready for Sunday school, galvanized the civil rights movement and sparked a surge of momentum that helped secure enactment of the both the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and Voting Rights Act of 1965. Because of the tragedy that took place here in 1963, the 16th Street Baptist Church remains a powerful symbol of the civil rights movement. The extraordinary sacrifices made by Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley are emblematic of many others who have lost their lives for the causes of freedom and equality. Their legacy will live on for generations to come.

Specification NameSpecification Value
Design Obverse: Barbara Fox
Sculpted by: Jim Licaretz
Reverse: Donna Weaver
Sculpted by: Joseph Menna
Struck Under Authority of: Public Law 113-11
Place Struck: United States Mint at Philadelphia

Shipping Information:
Please allow one to two (1-2) weeks for shipping of in stock products.

Purchase Information:
To ensure that all members of the public have fair and equal access to United States Mint products, any order placed prior to the official on-sale date and time of September 11, 2013, at 12 noon (ET) shall not be deemed accepted by the United States Mint and will not be honored.

If paying by credit card, please be sure your credit card information remains current to avoid any delays in processing your order. If your credit card has expired by the time of shipment, your order will be cancelled. To update credit card information after an order has been placed, you must call 1-800-USA-MINT (872-6468).