HONORING THE 225TH ANNIVERSARY
WITH A SPECIAL SET













August 1 marks the release of the latest product in our milestone anniversary series—the 225th Anniversary Enhanced Uncirculated Coin Set™. Like the 2017 American Liberty 225th Anniversary Gold Coin™ and American Liberty 225th Anniversary Silver Medal™, this set honors a milestone in the Mint’s history as it anticipates the next chapter of our story. The set contains 10 coins with an enhanced uncirculated finish using a combination of laser frosted areas and an unpolished field that accentuates design details, creating a unique contrast distinctly different from the mirror–like finish of proof coins.

225TH ANNIVERSARY ENHANCED UNCIRCULATED COIN SET


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AMERICAN LIBERTY 225th ANNIVERSARY SILVER MEDAL


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2017 AMERICAN LIBERTY 225TH ANNIVERSARY GOLD COIN


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Just as our Nation has evolved, so have our coins. Take a moment to think about the 225 years of design choices and technological innovations that have resulted in the coins you hold in your hands now. As part of our celebration, we have included a companion book and booklet to accompany the gold coin and silver medal 225th anniversary products, respectively. They provide an insightful summary on the evolution of our Nation’s coins and what various designs featuring Liberty represented to the United States at the time of the coins’ release. Here is an excerpt:

LIBERTY’S ORIGINS

Early artists depicted Liberty with classically–inspired European features and symbols, but the methods and tools available at that time limited the complexity of the designs. As the Nation evolved, so did depictions of Liberty on coins, and over time Liberty’s personifications reflected changes in the country. In addition to the advancing minting techniques that made more intricate designs possible, world events heavily influenced the way Liberty was depicted.

In times of war, Liberty became a defender with a shield; in times of peace, Liberty was depicted having traded the shield for an olive branch. Over time artists began to create images of Liberty with North American symbols like cotton and wheat or wearing a Native American headdress. Liberty’s imagery incorporated the Nation’s own history and attributes in addition to those of the Classical and French Revolutionary eras, and began to serve as a more fully developed icon of our national identity.

We plan to offer an additional anniversary product later this year. To make sure you’re notified when it’s available, please join our email list.


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“We will not forget that Liberty has here made her home;
nor shall her chosen altar be neglected.”

– President Grover Cleveland, speech accepting the Statue of Liberty from France in 1886